Australia’s Most Famous Internet Cat on Facebook and Instagram

Australia’s most famous internet cat must be Oliver. Oliver was recently crowned Australia’s number one cat after becoming an internet star with his rock video campaign. Oliver was the star of a series of cat parodies.

Oliver is a fiery ginger cat with a whole lot of personality.

Oliver is pictured with the trophies associated with his national title

Australia's Most Famous Internet Cat

Australia’s Most Famous Internet Cat

Oliver has his own Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/therealoliverthecat/

Follow our fearless feline on Facebook

Follow Oliver On Facebook

Follow Oliver On Facebook

Oliver has his own Instagram page oliver_thegingercat https://www.instagram.com/oliver_thegingercat/

Follow Oliver On Instagram

Follow Oliver On Instagram

Australia’s most famous internet cat is the star of these YouTube videos. Oliver is “Pretty Fly for a Red Guy”

Oliver is part of our mash up of Uptown Funk titled Uptown Funky Cat

Oliver is a really handsome ginger feline. He think’s he’s way too sexy

If you love cats, follow Australia’s most famous internet cat on Facebook and Instagram and watch our YouTube channel for more feline rock videos and cat parodies of famous songs. We love a good moggy mash up.

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Australia’s Most Famous Cat Is Oliver From Australind Vet

Who is the most famous cat in Australia? Australia’s most famous cat is Oliver of Australind Vet. Oliver recently won a national competition to be crowned Australia’s number one cat. Our feline ginger tabby is numero uno. Here’s a picture

Oliver is Australia's Number One Cat

Australia’s Most Famous Cat

Oliver has recently started his own facebook page to celebrate feline’s of the world and all red head nostalgia. Oliver loves a ginger and we do too. Here is a link to Australia’s most famous cat’s Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/therealoliverthecat/

Oliver was voted number one following his successful entry into the Dermcare clinic cat of the year competition http://dermcare.com.au/News/Our-Clinic-Cat-of-the-Year-Winning-Photos

Oliver jumped to feline stardom on the back of his very popular Youtube videos. Oliver is our ginger rock star. Check out his rock videos. Oliver is perhaps the coolest cat ever? Oliver stars in “Pretty Fly For a Red Guy”

Oliver also did a famous cat parody of Uptown Funk called Uptown Funky Cat

As a ginger rock and roll star with serious sex appeal, Oliver also starred in another feline parody of “I’m Too Sexy”

As you can see from the video’s we really love our cat. Oliver is now Australia’s most famous cat.

Follow Oliver on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/therealoliverthecat/

Oliver's Facebook Page

Oliver’s Facebook Page

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Funny Cat Videos

Check out these funny cat videos. Oliver’s greatest hits compilation one. Oliver is the clinic cat at Australind Veterinary Hospital. He recently won a national competition to be recognised as the Dermcare Clinic Cat of the Year.

Video 1. Oliver is Pretty Fly for a Red Guy

Video 2. Oliver is the Uptown Funky Cat

Video 3.  Oliver is Too Sexy

Oliver is Australia’s number one cat. We hope you enjoyed his funny cat videos.

Here is Australia’s number one cat

pretty fly for a red guy

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Dog Allergies

Dog allergies and dog skin conditions are extremely frustrating to treat. Immediate relief for your itchy dog can be found here www.itchydogtreatment.com The recurring nature of dog allergies leads to ongoing and chronic dog skin problems and frustration for dog owners and veterinarians alike.

Common dog allergies include flea allergy dermatitis, canine atopic dermatitis and food allergy also known as adverse food reaction. Contact allergies with plants and environmental allergens are also quite common. Dog allergies are the biggest cause of dog skin problems.

How do you know if your dog has allergies? What are the signs of allergies in dogs? Here is a video that might help you understand the Symptoms of Dog Allergies.

Flea allergy dermatitis in the dog is extremely common. It is also extremely easy to prevent with modern flea control products. FAD manifests as a dog skin rash on the caudal dorsal trunk and the base of the tail. Your pet is probably chewing and scratching at the back end and the tail base. The rash is red and very itchy. Your dog may have visible fleas and flea dirt also. You won’t always see fleas however and here is the frustration for dog owners. One flea will cause FAD. Flea allergy dermatitis is an acute allergic reaction to the flea saliva. The itch begins almost immediately causing a maddening pruritis that your pet will scratch at and even self mutilate. FAD is one of the most common causes of skin rashes on dogs.

Flea Allergy Dermatitis

Flea Allergy Dermatitis

Regular flea control is important in managing and preventing this condition. The modern oral treatments such as Bravecto, Nexguard and Comfortis are now considered the best flea control products because they are more effective than spot on treatments which was off and do not spread well across dog skin that is inflamed or infected. Skin infections in dogs are very common with flea allergy dermatitis due to intense pruritis and itching and scratching that damages the skin and causes pyoderma. If the skin is abnormal, spot on treatments are very ineffective. Fleas often get a chance to have a few bites on your dog’s skin before they die from spot on insecticides which still triggers an allergic reaction and intense pruritis. Frontline (fipronil) is now largely obsolete and we see a lot of pet owners still using it and being confused about why their pet has FAD. It doesn’t work well anymore.

Bravecto, Nexguard and Comfortis do not wash off and they are extremely safe and very effective. They are extremely effective products because they kill the flea before it gets a chance to inject the allergenic flea saliva. The flea is paralysed as the proboscis (tongue) is injected through the skin. Nexguard and Comfortis last for a month and Bravecto lasts for three months. It also seems that Bravecto works well against Demodex mange but resistance may develop into the future. Time will tell. I use Bravecto on my own dogs because of the convenience of the three month treatment regime which I synchronise with their anthelmintic intestinal worming tablet.

Capstar is a wonderfully effective product. If your dog has fleas, a single tablet will kill them fast. The only frustration is that the treatment is needed to be administered daily. Capstar has therefore been largely superseded by the longer acting oral products.

Food allergy or adverse food reaction is also a common cause of dog allergies. AFR often starts in the very young and sometimes as soon as your puppy starts on solid food. The symptoms are sometimes subtle. Here is a great video explaining the symptoms of food allergy in dogs.

Adverse Food Reaction commonly starts less than six months of age. You will see skin rashes like many other dog allergies however there is often some subtle symptoms that may give us some clues. Sometimes dogs with food allergy only have ear problems or sometimes only a chronic infection in the same ear. Sometimes AFR manifests as “ears and rears” ie your dog has chronic ear problems and an itchy bottom but no other skin problems. This can be an AFR.

A dog with AFR will often rub its face on the ground immediately after eating. This is because the lips are itchy. Dogs with food allergy often get chronic gastrointestinal problems like flatulence, intermittent vomiting and diarrhea and colitis which is seen as mucous on the stools. You may hear your dog having borborygmi which are “tummy rumbles” from food intolerance and an irritated bowel and small intestine. Sometimes the colitis is very mild and you will only see a “skin” on the stool. Sometimes the GI disturbance is violent causing hemorrhagic gastroenteritis.

Scooting is one of the signs of a food allergy in dogs.

The common food allergies in dogs are beef, wheat and chicken. dairy is common as well but it tends to cause more gastrointestinal symptoms like vomiting, diarrhea and flatulence as well as colic. Grain free diets aren’t much good if your dog is allergic to beef or chicken.

We are often asked what dog food is good for allergies? Dermatologists actually recommend a home cooked diet to do an initial food trial to see if your dog does actually have a food allergy. You need to use one type of protein (meat) and one type of carbohydrate (vegetable). In Australia we tend to use kangaroo and sweet potato. We used to use potato but it is used in so many commercial foods now that we use sweet potato as a first recommendation. Horse meat is also good as a protein source if it is available and you don’t have ethical issues using it…as for any meat of course.

Commercially available dog foods for AFR need to be used with caution. Many commercial allergy free foods are not actually very good at all. They should really be labelled low allergy rather than allergy free.

At the time of writing, Royal Canin Anallergenic diet is considered the best allergy free dog food. It has superseded Royal Canin hypoallergenic diet. Hills ZD is also very good. Hills ZD is actually a hydrolysed chicken product. About 10% of animals that are allergic to chicken will still react to hydrolysed chicken.

back in the 1990’s fish protein was considered a good additive to allergy free diets. A number of products sprung up such as Eukanuba FP. There is a hangover from this earlier theory with many foods containing fish protein. Dermatologists no longer consider fish protein to be suitable for an allergy free diet. Many foods that are “allergy free” contain fish protein. They may work in selected cases but are not considered the best choice since fish is a common allergen in cats as well as dogs.

Food allergy is also a common underdiagnosed cause of hotspots on dogs. Hot spots on dogs are caused from intense pruritis generated from an allergic reaction which induces the animal to scratch at the area. Constant and intense scratching damages the skin causing it to weep. The hair then sticks to the weeping sore and the bacteria on the skin explode causing a severe dog skin infection we call a moist eczema or hot spot. It is a severe skin infection created from self mutilation. Food allergy is not the only cause but it is often an under diagnosed cause of a dog hot spot.

We’d strongly recommend you go to your veterinarian if your dog has a hot spot but here’s an interesting video about hotspots on dogs and how you can treat them at home if you cannot get to a veterinarian or your veterinarian is closed.

You may also like these home remedies for hotspots on dogs.

What causes hot spots on dogs? generally they are caused from an allergic reaction to biting insects such as fleas, mosquitoes or midges, food allergy or atopic dermatitis. In rare circumstances it can be caused from a wet coat that traps water on the skin causing an infection but generally it is an intense pruritis from an allergic reaction that causes excessive scratching and self mutilation.

The most common dog skin conditions are caused by canine atopic dermatitis or atopy. This video is a fun look at common dog skin conditions.

Atopic dermatitis is a very frustrating problem. It is recurrent and drives dog owners to despair. Atopy typically starts between twelve months and two years of age but can start anywhere from one to six years of age. It looks like this.

Atopic Dermatitis in the Dog

Dogs with atopy have a skin barrier defect. The dog skin irritation is caused from water loss and drying out of the skin. The defective skin barrier loses water through the skin and is permeable to the entrance of allergens such as pollen, dust mite antigens and moulds. This is what causes canine atopic dermatitis.

Dog skin in canines with atopy is missing a protein called sphingosine in the ceramide  layer that holds all the skin cells together. It is pretty complicated to explain so here is a video with great pictures that helps you understand the skin barrier defect in canine atopy and why it causes dry skin on dogs and an itchy red rash. Watch the video about dry skin on dogs.

Canine atopic dermatitis occurs where the dog has limited hair covering such as the feet, the groin, the abdomen, the axilla and the inside of the ears. The skin dries out and there is an allergic reation as allergens go transdermal across the skin triggering mast cells to release histamine creating a red itchy rash and pruritis. This makes the dog lick and scratch.

dog allergies

dog allergies

Canine Atopic Dermatitis

Canine Atopic Dermatitis

Canine atopic dermatitis can only be cured by desensitisation using immunotherapy. Your dog needs to have a blood test and a skin prick test to work out what your dog is allergic to. Once the allergens are established, they are made into vaccines for immunotherapy. The common practice today is to start “rush therapy” over one day so that the dog can then go onto a simple monthly injection. This works in about 60% of cases.

For dog owners that cannot afford skin allergy testing and immunotherapy, we are left with trying to manage canine atopic dermatitis using a combination of treatment options.

Historically, veterinarians have used corticosteroids such as prednisolone. It is inexpensive and it works well but some dogs do develop severe side effects and sudden withdrawal can send your dog into a potentially fatal Addisonian crisis or hypoadrenocorticism. Side effects of chronic use include iatrogenic Cushings Syndrome or hyperadrenocorticism, diabetes mellitus, liver disease or a fatty liver, thinning of the skin, immunosuppression leading to chronic and recurrent infections and gut problems, gastrointestinal ulceration, osteoporosis, thromboembolism and in particular pulmonary embolism and brain infarctions from microthrombi.

A lot of dog owners do not like using corticosteroids due to the extensive list of severe side effects. Cyclosporin (Atopica) is also effective but is a very expensive treatment option. A new medicine is also available to treat canine atopy and it is really very good and very safe. The new drug is called oclacitinib (Apoquel). We love it. It works really well and it is very safe for long term use. Apoquel unfortunately is quite expensive. It is well worth the investment however since your dog will stop scratching and stinking within five days and will live a happier itch free life without the severe and damaging side effects of corticosteroids.

Due to the costs of the more effective medical treatments for canine atopic dermatitis, we are frequently asked about natural remedies for dogs with allergies. Whilst the above mentioned treatments are better, there is no doubt that there is actually quite a lot you can do to help your itchy dog stop scratching.

We would always recommend you take your pet to your veterinarian for the very best advice and for a proper diagnosis. This is important as there are some conditions that can mimic dog allergies. It is a reality unfortunately that proper veterinary care can be expensive and may be beyond the means of some people. There is many things that you can do. Here is an informative video about home remedies for dog allergies

If you are interested in home remedies, homeopathy ideas for dog skin and natural treatments for dog skin problems, then you may be interested in a book called “Treating The Itchy Scratching Dog The Natural Way.”

The book talks about home remedies for dog skin irritation and what to put on dogs itchy skin. The book focuses on dog skin irritation home treatment using natural remedies for dogs with allergies.

You can get a copy of Treating The Itchy Scratching Dog The Natural Way by clicking here.

This book is the comprehensive guide for do it yourself home remedies for dog allergies.

The strategies, treatments and therapies outlined in the book are also best practice for dogs undergoing traditional veterinary therapies prescribed by a veterinarian for dog allergies. You can use this book whether you are seeking alternative therapies or to supplement your dogs veterinary treatment.

Home Remedies For Dogs With Allergies

Home Remedies For Dogs With Allergies

You can GET THE BOOK HERE

 

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I Was Bitten By A Snake

I was bitten by a snake. Hi I’m Oliver the cat and I was bitten by a tiger snake. I wanted to share my survival story to let you know why I should be the winner of the Dermcare Clinic Cat of the Year for 2016.

You can vote for Oliver here http://dermcare.com.au/Dermcare-Clinic-Cat-of-the-Year/2016/Oliver-1

Here is my survival story.

I was much younger when the serpent struck. I was inspecting the long grass along the estuary forefront at the back of the Australind Veterinary Hospital. It is beautiful at the back of The Happiness Centre.

It was a warm spring morning. The sun was shining. There was a hint of summer in the sharp morning heat. The days were longer. The long cold winter was definitely over. The birds and the insect were out and it was a cat’s joy.

There were so many things to observe from my sharp eye’s perspective. I really as in the mood to play and I thought that if I rustled the grass a bit a grasshopper or something might jump and I could pounce on it.

So there I was, sun on my face. The joy of a warm spring day and glorious estuary views….and there it was. A wiggly tail. It moved slowly into the long grass. It was sort of black. It seemed to have feint yellow stripes on it. It was moving slowly out of sight…so I pounced. Got it!

And then it happened. The other end turned in the blink of an eye. Bam. Something hit my face. It happened so fast. And it hurt. Two sharp needles ha pierced my skin and there was a burning sensation…and the world started getting weird.

I was seeing double within minutes. There seemed to be two of everything but everything was blurry. I tried to mow for help but I only managed to pass a croaky whisper of a cat meow,

I started to walk. I was wobbly. My feet just didn’t seem to go where I wanted them to.

I staggered back to the hospital. I was really struggling now. Nurse Janet I squeaked. Janet ran to me and picked me up. She ran inside and shouted “something is wrong with Oliver”. Dr Rob took one look at me and said “snake bite”.

Oh dear I thought!

They put a catheter in me. I didn’t like it. I was getting fluids and then they started giving me something very slowly. They kept checking my gums and kept checking my eyes and my breathing.

I didn’t feel great.

I was put into critical care and nurse Janet sat with me. She never left my side. I knew they cared. I went to sleep but Janet kept poking me.

A few hours later I felt much better but I had to keep my IV on. I had to stay in the cage and I wasn’t very happy about that. Nurse Janet kept telling me I had to stay.

It sure was good not to have blurry vision anymore. My legs were working again.

Apparently I was a “very lucky cat”.

I had just used up one of my nine lives. It’s cool being a cat an having nine lives.

So I was the hospital “pet survivor of the week”.

I went on to become a rock star. I have made several rock videos and now I am in the running to be Australia’s number one cat in Dermcare’s clinic cat of the year. Here are my musical videos. I’m hoping you can also give me a vote below.

My first hit was Pretty Fly or a Red Guy

My second rock sensation was Uptown Funky Cat

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ma5Eh4jUbMc

 

Please give me a vote in Clinic cat of the year. I’d like to become Australia’s number one. Please help by clicking on the link and voting for Oliver from Australind Vet. You will get a return e-mail and you must click “confirm vote” to make your vote count.

Vote here http://dermcare.com.au/Dermcare-Clinic-Cat-of-the-Year/2016/Oliver-1

 

 

 

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DERMCARE CLINIC CAT OF THE YEAR : “PRETTY FLY FOR A RED GUY”

Oliver the clinic cat of Australind Veterinary Hospital has been nominated by our team in a bold bid to become Dermcare Clinic Cat of the Year with the launch of his campaign slogan “Pretty fly for a red guy”.

Watch the video by clicking on the image below or click here

Oliver is the famous ginger tabby of Australind Veterinary Hospital. This will be the first blog post in how Oliver came to live at The Happiness Centre and how Oliver was named.

Oliver is loved by our team of vets, nurses and receptionists

Oliver is Pretty Fly for a Red Guy

Oliver is Pretty Fly for a Red Guy

Follow Oliver’s blogs here and join him on our social media pages to follow the fun.

Here is how Oliver came to live at Australind Vet and how he was named…all thanks to one of our first veterinary nurses (nurse Janet).

Oliver writes,

I WAS BORN IN A BARN IN JUNE 2002 TO A GINGER QUEEN AND AN UNKNOWN FERAL FARM CAT CALLED “TOM”, WELL AT LEAST THAT’S WHAT MUMMY CALLED MY DAD. I NEVER KNEW MY FATHER. MUMMY LIVED IN A PRE CAT-LAW APOCOLYTIC ERA WHEN CATS WERE EXPENDIBLE. THE LIFE OF A CAT WAS CHEAP. WE EXISTED TO MAINTAIN RODENT POPULATIONS AND NOTHING ELSE. WE GREW UP TOUGH WITHOUT CREATURE COMFORTS. WE WERE ‘ARD. MUMMY HAD TO CATCH MICE TO FEED MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS. WHEN I WAS SIX WEEKS OF AGE I CAUGHT MY FIRST BABY MOUSE. I DIDN’T EAT IT THOUGH. WE PLAYED AND PLAYED.

AT THE TENDER AGE OF SIX WEEKS I WAS BUNDLED INTO A BOX AND LOADED ONTO THE BACK SEAT OF A CAR (I THINK). THE BOX WAS VERY DARK BUT I COULD SEE THROUGH A CRACK IN THE TOP. I KNEW IT WAS A CAR BECAUSE I HAD HEARD THE ENGINE BEFORE DRIVING AROUND THE FARM. MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS WERE VERY FRIGHTENED. WE WERE NOW ORPHANED. MUMMY WAS NOWHERE TO BE SEEN. WE DID NOT KNOW WHAT LAY AHEAD. I WAS A “GINGER” SO I TRUSTED THAT LIFE WOULD BE KIND TO ME. I HAD FAITH THAT EVERYTHING WOULD WORK OUT OK IN LIFE. THE UNIVERSE HAD MY BACK BECAUSE I WAS THE MOST HANDSOME CAT ON THE PLANET. I WOULD SURVIVE AND FLOURISH.

I WAS TAKEN TO A PLACE WHERE THIS FUNNY RINGING SOUND SEEMED TO HAPPEN EVERY FEW MINUTES. I COULD SMELL LOTS OF FUNNY SMELLS. I WAS PUT INTO A CAGE WITH MY FIVE OTHER BROTHERS AND SISTERS AND THIS WIRE DOOR SLAMMED SHUT IN OUR FACES. WE LOOKED AT EACH OTHER. WHAT WAS THIS PLACE? WHAT WOULD HAPPEN TO US?

WE WERE ALONE, OR SO I THOUGHT. I LOOKED ACROSS THE ROOM AND I SAW THIS STRANGE CREATURE STARING AT ME AND DROOLING. IT STARTED MAKING THIS TERRIBLE NOISE. I LATER LEARNED THAT THIS THING WAS A DOG. IT SEEMED TO BE A STRANGE DISEMPOWERED CREATURE THAT DROOLED AND YAPPED. I STARED AT IT FROM MY IVORY TOWER AND IT BARKED MORE. I REALISED IT COULDN’T HURT ME THROUGH THE CAGE. THIS POWER CAME OVER ME. I WAS A HANDSOME GINGER CAT WITH SUPER POWERS. I WASN’T AFRAID OF ANYTHING.

MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS FELT VERY SORRY FOR THEMSELVES. THEY ALL HUDDLED TOGETHER WITH A LOOK OF TERROR ON THEIR FACES. NOT ME. I WAS A ROCK STAR GINGER WITH SUPER POWERS. I COULD MAKE FUNNY FURRY DROOLING CREATURES BECOME APOCOLYPTIC WITH RAGE AND I’M NOT AFRAID TO ADMIT THAT I ENJOYED IT.

I STARTED CLIMBING UP THE WIRE CAGE DOOR BECAUSE I WAS A “SUPER CAT”

A HUMAN DRESSED IN A BLUE UNIFORM SAW ME CLIMBING THE CAGE. SHE OPENED THE CAGE AND PICKED ME UP. SHE SAID I WAS THE CUTEST BALL OF GINGER FLUFF SHE HAD EVER SEEN. I MADE EYE CONTACT WITH MY BIG BLUE EYES. MY GINGER GLOWED AND I FLUFFED MYSELF UP EVEN MORE. SHE CUDDLED ME AND TICKLED ME UNDER THE CHIN. SHE THEN GOT SOME WOOL AND I STARTED CHASING IT AROUND. HEY THIS WAS FUN. SHE CARRIED ME AROUND AND CUDDLED ME. I PURRED. SHE SNUGGLED. I PURRED AND FLUFFED MYSELF UP. I PATTED MY FEET ON HER LAP AND CURLED UP FOR A NAP. IT HAD BEEN A BIG DAY.

AFTER A CAT NAP, I WAS BACK IN THE CAGE WITH MY BROTHERS AND SISTERS. THEY WERE ALL HUDDLED AROUND A BOWL. I HAD NEVER SEEN THIS STUFF BEFORE BUT IT SMELT GOOD. THEY WERE HEAD DOWN TAIL UP SO I PUSHED IN TO GET A TASTE. THERE WASN’T MUCH LEFT. I GOT A MOUTHFUL OF THE MOST WONDERFUL FOOD I HAD EVER TASTED. IT WAS SO GOOD AFTER EATING DEAD RATS AND MICE THAT I CAN REMEMBER IT VIVIDLY TO THIS DAY. MMMMM MMMMMMMMMM. IT WAS GOOD.

BUT THERE WASN’T ENOUGH FOR ME. I WAS STILL HUNGRY. I RAN OVER TO THE CAGE DOOR AND WITH MY SUPER CAT POWERS I STARTED CLIMBING THE CAGE AGAIN. THE LADY IN THE BLUE UNIFORM WAS CALLED JANET. JANET I MEOWED. SHE CAME BACK OVER AND REALISED I WAS STILL HUNGRY. SHE ASKED ME IF I WANTED MORE AND I MEOWED AND PURRED MY LITTLE MOTOR. SHE GOT ME MORE FOOD. HOW GOOD WAS THIS?

SHE CALLED ME OLIVER TWIST. APPARENTLY IF YOU SAY “PLEASE SIR, CAN I HAVE SOME MORE” TO A HUMAN, THEY CALL YOU OLIVER TWIST. SOMETHING ABOUT A FAMOUS BOOK? ANYWAY, THAT WAS HOW I GOT MY NAME OLIVER TWIST (OR OLIVER FOR SHORT).

FOR MORE ABOUT MY LIFE STORY, PLEASE FOLLOW MY BLOG. AND MAKE SURE YOU WATCH MY SONG “PRETTY FLY FOR A RED GUY” ON YOUTUBE AND STAY TUNED FOR THE VERY EXCITING PARODIES WE HAVE PLANNED ON OUR ROADMAP TO VICTORY.

YOU CAN FOLLOW MY DARING ATTEMPT TO BECOME “DERMCARE CLINIC CAT OF THE YEAR 2016” ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA. LIVE A LIFE WITHOUT FEAR! GINGER POWER ACTIVATE! MEOW!

BLOG : http://www.australindvet.com.au/contact-us/australind-vet-gossip

FACEBOOK : https://www.facebook.com/australind.vet

YOUTUBE : https://www.youtube.com/user/AustralindVet

TWITTER : https://twitter.com/AustVetHospital

INSTAGRAM : https://www.instagram.com/australindvet/

Help Oliver become dermcare clinic cat of the year by giving him a vote. Click here and vote for Oliver. You will receive a return e-mail and you must click “confirm vote” to register your vote.

Thanks

 

 

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Australind Vet is Building a New Veterinary Hospital in Treendale

After many years of planning, Australind Vet is building a new veterinary hospital in Treendale.

Watch the walls going up here in time lapse photography.

The new veterinary facility is made from concrete tilt panels. It was incredible how quickly the walls were made and lifted. The roof was on two weeks after that.

Mapel Builders have been a great company to work with.

Pad cleared October 2015

Pad cleared October 2015

Trenches done

Trenches done November 2015

Concrete pad preparation

Concrete pad preparation

20151216_060930

hard yakka

Christmas 2015 - pad poured

Christmas 2015 – pad poured

First panel lifted 21.1.2015

First panel lifted 21.1.2016

walls up - front

walls up – front

walls up - back

walls up – back

20160206_125726

roof on 5.2.2016

Our facility will be beautiful. It has been designed with the emotional wellbeing of your pet in mind.

This state of the art facility will be open 8am to 8pm seven days a week and staffed with our award winning customer service team.

In this new hospital, we will be able to bring you a new level of veterinary excellence.

Stay tuned for further updates on the new veterinary hospital in Treendale

 

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Alternatives to Canine Cruciate Surgery in the Dog

There are a few alternatives to canine cruciate surgery in the dog.

An orthotic brace can be used as an alternative to canine cruciate surgery. The orthotic brace can be used instead of surgery or as a complement to surgery to support and protect the stifle joint post operatively.

orthotic brace for the stifle of a dog as an alternative to canine cruciate surgery

orthotic brace for the stifle of a dog as an alternative to canine cruciate surgery

Here is a fun video looking at alternatives to surgery

Canine cruciate disease is the most common orthopaedic disease in the dog. It is diagnosed by pain on stifle joint manipulation, joint effusion, a medial buttress, a cranial drawer and a positive sit test.

Dogs are lame raning from mild lameness to non weight bearing lameness.

There has been quite a few alternative surgeries postulated over the years as a means to fixing this orthopaedic problem. each procedure has pros and cons and varying results.

Two decades ago we took a tendon graft from the tensor fascia lata muscle for the over the top technique which is a similar technique to how peoplehave an ACL repair. The graft would often stretch or break and results were frustratingly poor.

A prosthetic ligament technique was and still is a very popular repair technique. This is the De Angelis technique. It is relatively simple compared with complex osteotomies and in the hands of an experienced surgeon, results are quite satisfactory.

Specialists are now recommending an soteotomy technique to change the angle of the tibial slope so that an cranial cruciate ligament is not required.

osteotomies have an increased complexity and an increased risk of severe complications if they do not go well. If an osteotomy procedure goes bad, it goes really bad and may require amputation in a worst case scenario.

Specialist surgeons will turn away hyper exuberant dogs for this reason. If post operative aftercare cannot be guaranteed and the dog restricted and confined to a small area to be kept quiet, suregeons will not perform an osteotomy.

The gold standard for surgery for canine cruciate disease is the TPLO. The Tibial Plateau Leveling osteotomy. This is quite a complex procedure requiring specialised bone saws that make a curved cut into the proximal tibia. After changing the angle of the stifle joint, the tibia is bone plated using a TPLO plate to maintain the angle. Healing occurs in 10-12 weeks. Strict post op confinement is necessary to insure a good outcome. This can be an expensive procedure if done at a specialist referral hospital.

The TTO is a modification of this process. The Triple Tibial osteotomy arguably creates the same change in angle as the TPLO to alter the tibial slope so that an CCL is not required.

The TTA has a few variations. This is the most simple of the osteotomies but also the osteotomy with the most complications. It arguably does not correct the caudal tibial slope as well as a TPLO or a TTO. This will be disputed by exponents of the TTA.

The gold standard however is the TPLO.

Not everybody can afford to have a TPLO performed by an orthopaedic specialist.

Not every dog owner wants to have surgery for their dogs cranial cruciate disease.

An orthotic stifle brace makes a satisfactory alternative to surgery for dog owners who would prefer a conservative approach to treating CCL disease in their dog.

Some geriatric patients may have organ disease or heart lung disease that would make a long general anaesthesia too risky. An aorthotic brace for the dog’s stifle is a satisfactory solution for pateints that cannot handle a general anaesthesia.

Other alternate therapies include platelet rich plasma therapy

Stem cell therapy can also have remarkable results

Phone Australind Veterinary Hospital on 08 97971584 for more information on canine orthotics and prosthetics and alternatives to surgery.

Don’t forget to like us on facebook

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Alternate Treatment and Natural Healing Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy PRP

People are always looking for alternate treatment to traditional western medicine for a variety of reasons. Natural healing occurs within the body and Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy PRP is a good example of how we can resource the bodies natural healing properties. Natural healing platelet rich plasma therapy is very popular at Australind Veterinary Hospital and we are getting very good results.

Platelets exist in the body and are well know for their role in blood clotting. When you cut yourself, platelets form a plug to create haemostasis to stem the bleeding. Platelets also contain growth factors which are released when platelets are activated. Growth factors stimulate tissue regeneration and natural healing.

The growth factors in platelets include :

platelet derived growth factor

transforming growth factor beta

insulin – like growth factor 1

insulin – like growth factor 2

fibroblast growth factor

epidermal growth factor

Interleukin 8

vascular endothelial growth factor

keratinocyte growth factor

Connective tissue growth factor

Platelets therefore are an amazing source of the bodies natural healing chemicals that stimulate repair and regeneration of tissues.

Platelet rich plasma therapy is a concentrated form of platelets that are injected into the area that we need to repeair or stimulate regeneration. PRP increases platelets by ten times thus concentrating the regenerative process ten fold.

It really works.

We have been using PRP at Australind Veterinary Hospital for the last twelve months being the first veterinary hospital in Western Australia to use this technology.

At Australind Vet we have found the use of PRP to be especially helpful following cruciate surgery for canine cruciate disease. We get faster natural healing and earlier return to function of the stifle joint. Earlier weight bearing allows earler rehabilitation exercises. There is a synergy of faster healing and faster rehabilitation leading to more successful surgical outcomes.

Blood is collected from the patient. This is collected into a special syringe that will allow separation of the cells, plasma and platelets. The collected blood is put into a centrifuge and spun to separate the blood into the different components.

Blood has been spun to separate cells from the platelet rich plasma PRP

Blood has been spun to separate cells from the platelet rich plasma PRP

Once the blood is collected and spun in a centrifuge, it is separated. using the specially designed syringes, the platelet rich plasma can now be drawn into a separate syringe for injection. The photo below shows the special syringe which draws the PRP away from the blood cells. The syringe is unwound from the original blood collection unit and can now be used for injection into the body at the site for natural healing to be stimulated and maximised.

PRP has been drwan off for injection

PRP has been drawn off for injection

Now that the PRP has been collected, it can be used for injection into any area of the body that requires natural healing.

If you are interested in alternate healing therapies and natural treatment for injuries, we have found PRP to be useful for canine cruciate disease for pre and post operative treatment. It is also helpful for osteoarthritis. PRP is particularly useful for tendon and ligament injuries. We have used it for gastrocnemius tendon (achilles) injuries, shoulder injures and elbow injuries. It is a great adjunct to all soft tissue surgeries.

PRP has also been shown to be helpful for healing corneal ulcers of the eye.

We use Platelet Rich Plasma post operatively following canine cruciate surgery.

Platelet Rich Plasma PRP being injected into the canaine stifle following cruciate surgery for a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament in the dog

Platelet Rich Plasma PRP being injected into the canaine stifle following cruciate surgery for a ruptured cranial cruciate ligament in the dog

PRP therapy can also reduce pain. Analgesia can be improved post operatively as well as post traumatically by using PRP.

This exciting technology is used at Australind Veterinary Hospital.

Call us on 97971584 for more information.

Like us on Facebook and follow the love!

Australind vet

We also do Stem Cell Therapy for natural healing. Check the amazing results of stem cell therapy here.

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Artificial Legs and Braces For Dogs Alternative To Surgery And Chemotherapy

With advances in artificial limb technology, people are able to choose alternatives to surgery that can actually be beneficial to their pet. Leg braces ( orthotics ) and artificial legs ( prosthetics ) are now available as cutting edge veterinary solutions for your pets.

Watch this video to see what is available in the twenty first century for your pet

Australind Veterinary Hospital is a referral centre in Western Australia for canine orthotics and prosthetics V-OP. We can assess your pet’s injuries or cancer to see whether there is an alternative solution to surgery or chemotherapy for your pet.

Dr Rob Hill has a special interest in this rapidly growing field. The world of veterinary science has never offered so many possibilities. At Australind Veterinary Hospital, we strive to stay on the cutting edge of advances in the veterinary profession. Dr Rob Hill attended a workshop at the AVA ( Australian Veterinary Association ) annual conference in 2014. An American specialist in veterinary orthotics and prosthetics gave informative lectures and workshops to Australian delegates.

Dr Rob Hill can assess your pet’s suitability for an orthotic brace or prosthetic limb and perform the necessary casting to create the V-OP device. The device is custom built and will be shipped directly to your door. We can assist with fitting and any queries you may have.

Dr Rob Hill has formed a working relationship with an animal Physiotherapist to assist in getting your custom built V-OP device made to fit and to assist with any rehabilitation required.

Canine cruciate disease is a frustrating problem. There are many different surgical procedures that offer differing success rates and financial costs. Unfortunately not all canine cruciate surgeries go well. Complications arise from the frustration of the anatomy of the canine stifle (knee) as well as the high activity of dog’s and the challenges in keeping them quiet post operatively. The dog’s stifle is very unstable which is why it is designed to fail in the first instance. Hyperactivity post op can also cause surgical failure.

A stifle brace can be used as an alternative to surgery or as a support for surgery post op to improve surgical outcomes and assist with rehabilitation post operatively.

Another challenging and common injury in the dog is hyperextension of the carpus. When an animal jumps off something high or puts the carpus (wrist) through extreme forces whilst running and changing direction, sometime the carpus can extend too far damaging or completely tearing the ligaments. This is an orthopaedic disaster for the carpus. Until recently, surgery was the only option. An expensive and painful surgery fraught with complications to fuse the carpus with a bone plate had been the solution. Whilst this is sometimes still necessary, an orthotic brace is now a genuine alternative for this injury.

Veterinary prosthetics are also becoming more sophisticated with this technology developing rapidly. Artificial limbs for dogs, cats and other pets are now a reality.

Soft tissue sarcoma’s of the distal limb in dogs are a frustrating condition to treat. Surgery is often not curative as the cancer grows back. Wounds often cannot be closed due to large skin margins being taken during surgery. The pet has a large wound that can take months to heal with all the frustration and costs of weeks or months of bandaging only for the tumor to regrow. Chemotherapy is not always successful and can cause a lot of complications due to the cytotoxic nature of these drugs. A prosthetic solution may be available for your dog or pet with soft tissue sarcoma’s or other cancers of the leg.

Here’s the link to our website at Australind Vet.

We’d love to help.

You can see a fun video about veterinary orthotics and prosthetics on our YouTube Channel

Why don’t you like our Facebook page and follow the love. Please share our video about animal orthotics and prosthetics with your friends. The V-OP revolution is changing the world for your dogs, cats and pets. Please spread the word about an alternative to surgery and chemotherapy.

Waggy tails from Dr Rob

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