Testicular Cancer and Sertoli Cell Tumor in a Dog – Benefits of Castration

Testicles that do not descend into the scrotum are called retained testicles. retained testicles can be anywhere from the kidney to the inguinal ring. The embryonic testicle buds off the kidney andmigrates from the kidney, through the inguinal ring and down into the scrotum.

In some cases, this migration doesn’t happen. A common place for a retained testicle to get trapped is the journey through the inguinal ring in the groin.

Retained testicles are exposed to a higher body temperature than a normal testicle in the scrotum. It is hypothesised that this higher body temperature predisposes the retained testicle to malignant change. It is common for a retained testicle to become cancerous.

A common variant of cancerous transformation is a sertoli cell tumor. These dogs may have hair loss on the caudal trunk, have shrinkage of male sex organs like the other normal testicle in the scrotum and shrinkae of the penis. The nipples and mammary tissue may develop. The dog may take on feminine characteristics. These are the changes often seen with sertoli cell tumore in dogs. Approximately 14% of sertoli cell tumors can become malignant and spread to lymph nodes. These can be fatal.

It is critical to have retained testicles removed as young as possible if your dog’s testicles have not descended into the scrotum. Castration of normal males is also a great way of preventing testicular cancer and prostatic disease. early castration can also prevent benign prostatic hyperplasia; prostatic neoplasia, testicular cancer and male behavioural traits like aggression and territorial urinating and marking.

Ask one of our friendly team about the benefits of castration at Australind Vet.

Sertoli cell tumor on the left. The other testicle is atrophied

Sertoli cell tumor on the left. The other testicle is atrophied

Hair loss from caudal trunk

Hair loss from caudal trunk

 

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